‘Tis The Season To Be Fearful

You’ve been off for that week of Christmas, the celebrations are (at least, mostly) over, and you’re beginning to think about returning to work. You feel the anxiety and that pit in your stomach starting to sink in. It’s what you were dreading: The Fear. Luckily there are a few things you can do to make the fear a little less worse, whether it’s recovering from the Christmas party the night before or easing back into work.

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Julie Farrar
Silly Season Socialising

With Christmas time comes the Christmas parties, catch up, family events and so on. If you’re naturally more introverted, this time of year can be quite draining. Also, it doesn’t help that get togethers at this time of year tend to be louder, brighter and more challenging than usual. But that doesn’t mean you have to dread this festive season.

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Julie Farrar
Is Your Teen Socially Anxious or just Introverted?

Does your teen seem to lack friends and spend most of their time alone? Most parents are worried by signs that their child is isolated or disconnected from their peers – and with good reason. Adolescence is a period where young people typically turn towards their peers for the identification and social interaction they used to get from their families. They become increasingly aware of the society outside their immediate home and school environment, and orient themselves towards the world as a whole. If your teen seems to be turning inwards instead of outwards, you might worry that something is wrong, or that they don’t get to experience the aspects of life that they need to grow into fully formed adults.

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Lauren Casey
Managing your self-critic

Does it often feel like you’re your own worst enemy? Like your self-esteem and confidence is held back by a small voice at the back of your mind, magnifying your failures and discounting your successes? In such a way that, even if something goes well (say, an exam or a social event), it doesn’t reduce your fear of messing up next time? In that case, your inner critic might be too powerful.

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Lauren Casey
How to build self-compassion

We all know that believing in ourselves is important. Countless films, fairytales and even advertisements have told us that we can accomplish anything if we just believe in ourselves. So having low self-esteem can easily feel like failure – another way in which you’re not the person you should be. Trying to love yourself can feel like a tall order when it seems like you’re barely acceptable, and trying to force it can leave you feeling hopeless.

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Lauren Casey
Addiction or Coping Strategy? (Part II)

Do you have issues with substances? Because of the way drinking and drugs are seen as part of normal youth life, it can be hard to tell if you have a problem, or if you’re just doing the same as everyone else. However, research shows that most young people assume that others drink more than they actually do, and thus underestimate their own drinking in comparison.

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Lauren Casey
Understanding You: World Mental Health Week 2018

It’s World Mental Health Week from 7th - 13th October 2018 and this year the focus is building awareness for young people and their mental health in a changing world.

Below are some helpful tips for young people on dealing with mental health challenges and some guidelines to understanding why they may be feeling or behaving in a certain way.

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Julie Farrar
Managing Conflict

Conflict is never a desirable thing, but it is something that we all encounter frequently, in all walks of life. Whether it is at home, school, work, or with friends, conflict can arise at any time for almost any reason. How you deal with it can have a huge impact on your career path, your personal relationships, and your overall happiness in life. Below we have listed a number of tips to help you learn how to manage conflict, and resolve rather than escalate the situation.

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Emily Sullivan
Signs of Mental Illness in Younger Children

When people think of mental health, they tend to think of people in their teens and up. It is easy to forget, but children have minds that work as much as ours do, just in a different way. But for many different reasons, mental health issues in children are a subject that is often overlooked. In many cases, children may not have the ability to communicate their issues. Other times, parents will attribute any unusual behaviour to kids just being kids.

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Emily Sullivan
Mindful walking

Mindful walking is a form of meditation where you use a slow walk as an opportunity for observation and introspection. It involves being as relaxed as possible, while at the same time being hyper aware of your body and the world around you. This is to help rid your mind of any negative or cumbersome thoughts, and encourage you to live in the moment.

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Julie Farrar